Headroom Project…Your input wanted

Lance has developed pretty good radar over the past 50 years that he has been 6’4”+. He usually does not get caught unawares with an unexpected head bash.

Of course, most of the places we hang out have 8’ ceilings and the doorways are plenty tall.

It wasn’t always that way. Our first apartment was in a basement. The bathroom was a little closet in the kitchen/living room/bedroom. You had to step into the kitchen area to wash your hands. There was a cast iron sewer line hanging from the ceiling right outside the bathroom door with a connection fitting that was in just the right (wrong?) place for a painful, middle-of-the-night wake-up.

Fortunately, that only lasted for a few months before we moved on, and we haven’t had to deal with the headroom situation. Until now.

Boats, especially boats right-sized for the loop, don’t generally have generous headroom.

As we discussed in a previous post, having a boat where Lance can stand fully upright is a very high priority.

In that post, we looked at how the number of boats in the intersection of Budget – Length – Headroom is, in our case, quite small.

Venn diagram
We’re looking for ~40′ and under $100K.

However, it occurred to me that other people may not have the same budget and length constraints, but may still be interested in seeing what we have found out about headroom as we walk through various boats.

Lance has been taking notes about the various boats we’ve been on, primarily at boat shows and boat brokerages.  I’ve started a spreadsheet to keep track of whether Lance, at 6’5” with shoes, has headroom to stand up straight on the various boats. The notes are simple, saying “yes” or “no” to the headroom question.

Access the google sheet to see what our experience has been.

To tell you the truth, we didn’t make notes about new boats or other boats that were clearly out of our price range, even if we went on them at the boat show. So, there may be some Ranger Tugs or American Tugs or others that we’ve missed. We’ll make a point of making notes in the future and add to the spreadsheet.

Here’s where you can help. I want to collect similar information from other tall folk. What is YOUR experience on various boats? I imagine you’ve been keeping your own list. Let’s combine the lists and have a useful resource! I am more interested in your personal experience on the boat than in the advertised headroom.

If you are at least 6’4” and have personal experience with headroom on some boats, send me a message either through Facebook, the comment section of the blog, or the comments on the google spreadsheet.

We’ll add your information to the spreadsheet as a service to future loopers.

Let’s do this thing!

Adventures on Stinkpot – One couple’s story

What do the Great Loop, a professional folk musician and America’s Funniest Home Videos have in common? Dave Rowe and Stacey Guth, that’s what!

Stacey and Dave have created time lapse videos of the Great Loop accompanied by soundtracks of Dave’s folk music, which you can find on their Folk on the Water YouTube channel.

I’ve been following Our Adventures on Stinkpot on Facebook for a while. They’ve occasionally posted little snippets of their financial back story. I asked if they would be interested in adding to our collection of stories here…and they made a video! How fun is that! “How poor people can finance a long boat adventure!” I love it!

In fact, they’ve made a whole new YouTube channel about “How to Live on a Boat”.

Watch their video to hear how they were able to make their dream come to life from a financial perspective. It is pretty inspiring!

Oh, and what about the America’s Funniest Home Videos? Check out this video that landed them a spot in the finalists of the March 29, 2020 episode. Then check out their after-party live video.

Looping in Segments – Williamson

Overhead view of Albin 43 trawler

I’ve seen a lot of interest lately in the concept of looping in segments. That is, taking more than one year to do the loop. Why would someone decide to do it that way?  What are the benefits?

Lance and I have discussed an itinerary which would include storing the boat for a winter somewhere in northern New York after exploring Lake Champlain, the Rideau Canal, and the Thousand Islands. This would give us time to enjoy the area while putting us in a good position to enter the Trent Severn as soon as it opens the next year and then take our time in North Channel and Georgian Bay.

Naturally, I keep an eye out for mention of Loopers who winter their boats in New York.

AGLCA member Charles Williamson’s forum comments about where he stored his trawler for the winter(s) caught my attention: New York and Ontario over two consecutive winters.

Two winters in the north? That is intriguing!

I reached out to see what the story is and why.

Continue reading “Looping in Segments – Williamson”

Twenty-five Feet Around the Loop – Daydream – Anderson

One strategy to do America’s Great Loop is to use the boat you already own.  

In 2009 I followed a blog of a couple who cast off their lines from their Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway home to do the loop on their 26 foot Glacier Bay Catamaran. I watched with fascination as it seemed like such a small boat to live on for the better part of the year. At one point, when someone asked them why they chose that boat, they answered, “It is the one we had.” 

Pat and Patty Anderson did one better than that.  

Continue reading “Twenty-five Feet Around the Loop – Daydream – Anderson”

What Yacht to Do? – Crouse

Sam and Rev Crouse created What Yacht To Do to show how you can be sitting in your living room one day and then living on the water the next. (You have to say “What Yacht To Do” with a Texas accent to get the full effect…“What ya ought to do”.)

The Crouses are, at this writing, about three months into their loop. They have a series of entertaining blogs and YouTube videos to document the trip, both the ups and the downs.

I was so excited to see that one of their first posts is titled “How we can leave home for a year”. Yes! This is exactly the treasure I look for in blogs. 

Pray tell!

Continue reading “What Yacht to Do? – Crouse”

“More fun than fuel” – Captain John

Is there any looper out there who has not read at least some of Captain John’s many Great Loop webpages?

He has had a website almost as long as there has been an internet!

His first loop was in 1971. He’s owned boats his entire adult life.

Captain John has been looping and living on a boat since he retired in 1995. With 10+ loops under his belt, he has plenty of opinions and views on various aspects of cruising the Great Loop, including the financial aspect.

Continue reading ““More fun than fuel” – Captain John”

Technology Enabled Nomads- Technomadia

Talk about Great Loop financial backstories! One of the most comprehensive and transparent ones you will find is by Technomadia.

They have an excellent post about the thought processes behind buying and paying for their 4788 Bayliner.  This particular post really opened my eyes to some possibilities I had never considered.

First, they discuss what they learned that had them increasing their original budget.

Continue reading “Technology Enabled Nomads- Technomadia”

Buy a Boat, Sell the Boat, Start a Movement – Stob

[Book Review. This is the book that first piqued our interest in the Great Loop. Here’s a review through a “financial backstory” lens. ]

Honey, Let’s Get a Boat by Ron and Eva Stob is the book that really started it all. The Stobs travelled the loop in 1994 and published a book about it 1999. They went on to form the “America’s Great Loop Cruiser’s Association”, the AGLCA, which continues today.

The Story

The Stobs were in their fifties when they were ready for a break in their careers, a sabbatical, if you will.

Continue reading “Buy a Boat, Sell the Boat, Start a Movement – Stob”